Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Review: STAR WARS #5

STAR WARS #5
DARK HORSE COMICS – @DarkHorseComics

SCRIPT: Brian Wood
ART: Carlos D’Anda
COLORS: Gabe Eltaeb
LETTERS: Michael Heisler
EDITOR: Randy Stradley
COVER: Rodolfo Migliari
28pp, Color, $2.99 U.S. (May 2013)

“In the Shadow of Yavin” Part Five

Set during the time of the original and classic Star Wars film trilogy, Star Wars is a recently launched comic book series from Dark Horse Comics. Star Wars is written by Brian Wood, drawn by Carlos D’Anda, colored by Gabe Eltaeb, and lettered by Michael Heisler.

Star War’s opening story arc is “In the Shadow of Yavin.” It begins shortly after the events depicted in Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope. The Rebel Alliance destroyed the Galactic Empire’s fearsome space station, the Death Star, at the Battle of Yavin. However, the Rebellion, still fighting off attacks from the Empire, is trying to find a new permanent home base. Princess Leia Organa has formed a secret squadron of stealth X-wing fighters to help find a new rebel base, but she must also expose a spy within the Rebellion’s ranks

Senator Leia Organa and her secret squadron of stealth X-wings enter the Pybus System, in the continuing search for a new rebel base. As Star Wars #5 opens, Leia and her squadron are fighting off two squadrons of TIE fighters and an Imperial Interdictor. Of course, the Rebels have some success, but the TIE squadrons are commanded by the ambitious Colonel Bircher, and he plans on matching the Rebels trick for trick.

Meanwhile, Han Solo and Chewbacca seek refuge in the underworld of Coruscant, the Imperial center. Is Perla their salvation? Meanwhile, Darth Vader continues to make plans with Birra Seah. Luke Skywalker and Prithi prepare to disobey Leia, again, but at least they mean well.

As I wrote in my review of the fourth issue, this new Star Wars comic book is like having a follow-up to the original Star Wars film. It’s like an imaginary television series called “Star Wars: The Day After” or “What Happened after Luke Destroyed the Death Star.”

Writer Brian Wood has summoned his inner George Lucas and Alan Dean Foster (the ghost writer of the novelization of the first Star Wars movie). Carlos D’Anda’s art goes back in time, recalling Howard Chaykin, the first Star Wars comic book artist, and creates art that looks like classic, 1970s Star Wars comics. In fact, Wood and D’Anda, issue by issue, are building a Star Wars masterpiece.

A

Reviewed by Leroy Douresseaux


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